Services and Innovations

The Pediatric Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Program at the Children's Hospital of Michigan offers a number of services and innovative programs detailed below.

Craniofacial Surgery

The Craniofacial Surgery team at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan provides multidisciplinary care to infants and children with cranialsynostosis, head shape abnormalities, hemifacial microsomia and other facial syndromes or trauma. The team is led by a fellowship-trained pediatric plastic/craniofacial surgeon and a multidisciplinary team including pediatric subspecialists with expertise in neurosurgery, otolaryngology (ear, nose and throat), speech therapy, audiology, orthodontics, oral surgery, ophthalmology, prosthodontics, nutrition, psychology, neurosurgery, pediatric imaging and interventional radiology.

  • Cranialsynostosis and head shape abnormalities

    —The Craniofacial Surgery team at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan provides surgical and non-surgical treatments — including molding helmets (with and without surgery), strip craniectomies and complex cranial reshaping procedures for children with complex head shape abnormalities.
  • Pierre Robin Sequences

    — The Children’s Hospital of Michigan offers treatment for children with Pierre Robin Sequence. Patients are evaluated in a pediatric sleep lab to determine the severity of the condition and the most appropriate plan of care. Treatment options range from conservative treatments like repositioning and monitoring to more aggressive surgical treatments such as mandibular distraction and lip tongue adhesion.
  • Plagiocephalys

      — The Craniofacial Surgery team provides care for children with plagiocephaly. Treatment options include aggressive repositioning and the use of molding helmets.
  • Facial trauma

     — Fellowship-trained pediatric subspecialists in craniofacial surgery, oral surgery, dentistry, neurosurgery and ophthalmology treat infants and children with significant facial trauma at the Children's Hospital of Michigan.

Cleft Lip and Palate

The Children’s Hospital of Michigan provides multidisciplinary care and innovative surgical procedures for infants and children with cleft lip and palate. The multidisciplinary team includes fellowship-trained pediatric subspecialists with expertise in craniofacial surgery, neurosurgery, otolaryngology (ear, nose and throat), orthodontics, oral surgery, speech therapy, audiology, nutrition and psychology.

A variety of innovative procedures are performed for those requiring cleft lip and palate repairs, including Nasoaveolar Molding (NAM). 

Even before surgical repairs can be started, the Cleft Lip and Palate team helps families care for infants with the condition. These children often face significant feeding challenges in their first few weeks and months. Specially trained nurses and nutritionists can help with special bottles, feeding plans and support.

Surgical repair of cleft lip and palate involves a series of complex procedures over many years. The initial lip repair is usually performed at about 3 months of age. Ear tubes are often placed during the initial procedure. Palate repair is usually performed at about 6 to 9 months of age. Frequent follow-up care is required to monitor hearing, speech, dental and orthodontic development. Additional surgeries to the jaw and nose may be required as the child matures into adulthood. The Cleft Lip and Palate team at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan often provides care to patients into their early 20s.

Vascular Anomalies

Pediatric subspecialists in plastic surgery, dermatology, interventional radiology and other pediatric subspecialties work together to provide comprehensive, multidisciplinary care to children with vascular anomalies.

  • Hemangiomas

     — Hemangiomas can interfere with vision, feeding and breathing. In severe cases, multiple hemangiomas can cause heart and lung failure. The Pediatric Vascular Anomalies team uses several techniques to treat children with hemangiomas, including steroid injections, surgical procedures and pharmaceutical therapies.
  • Vascular malformations

     — Vascular malformations include malformations of arteries, veins, capillaries and the lymphatic system. These complex malformations often require significant multidisciplinary care. The Pediatric Vascular Anomalies team uses several techniques to treat children with vascular malformations, including embolization, laser therapy and surgery.

Burn Reconstruction and Wound Care

The Pediatric Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery team serves on the multidisciplinary staff of the Burn Center at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan, one of a few in the nation to be verified by the American Burn Association (ABA) and the Committee on Trauma of the American College of Surgeons (ACS).

As part of the Burn Center, our fellowship-trained pediatric plastic surgeons perform:

  • Acute burn care
  • Wound care
Secondary burn reconstruction with skin grafting, scar release, tissue expanders and flaps.